Aging & Adult Services - DAAS
Report Abuse

Only the calls that involve abuse, neglect, or exploitation need to be referred to APS Intake. If the call has to do with resident's rights, then the information can be reported directly to your local Ombudsman office.

How to Report Abuse

Call local law enforcement immediately if there is an emergency.

In Utah, the law (62A-3-305 and 76-5-111.1) states that any person who has reason to believe that an elder or disabled adult is being abused, neglected or exploited must immediately report the situation to Adult Protective Services (APS) intake or the nearest law enforcement office.

Please be prepared to offer the following information: (note: all information is not necessary, but helpful)

    • Name, address, and phone number of victim.
    • Identifying information of the victim such as: birth date, social security number, age, and ethnicity.
    • Name, address, and phone number of alleged perpetrator (if applicable).
    • Identifying information regarding alleged perpetrator. (if applicable).
    • Your name, phone number and address.
    • Provide information on any disability, health problem or mental illness.
    • Reason for concern (alleged abuse, neglect or exploitation).

Resident’s Rights

Anyone (residents, relatives, friends or even the staff of a facility) may initiate a complaint on behalf of the resident. Often residents are unable to do it themselves. Only as mutually agreed upon, between the ombudsman and the resident or his/her legal representative, the ombudsman will make every reasonable effort to assist, represent and intervene on behalf of the resident. Services are provided to persons:

    • Without regard for income and resources
    • As requested by an individual or on behalf of an individual
    • Available to a person who resides in a long-term care facility
    • Available to a person attempting to enter a facility

If you are a resident or have a loved one in a nursing home, the link below can provide information highlighting your rights.

Resident's Rights

Ombudsman Program Overview

The heart of the Long Term Care Ombudsmen Program is the team of certified Ombudsmen who are empowered to resolve issues surrounding the care and quality of life for people living in nursing homes and assisted living facilities. Ombudsmen are there to represent the residents' interests. It is the residents' desires and needs that are considered and acted upon.

Being an Ombudsman is an important responsibility that is taken on with great care and professionalism. In Utah, Ombudsmen are certified only after receiving extensive training.

 

Code of Ethics

As an Ombudsman

    • Participate in efforts to maintain and promote the integrity of the long-term care Ombudsman program.
    • Act in accordance with its standards and procedures.
    • Recognize the boundaries of my own level of training and skills and consult with an Ombudsman supervisor when needed.
    • Provide services with respect for human dignity and the individuality of the resident unrestricted by considerations of age, social or economic status, personal characteristics or lifestyle.
    • Respect and promote residents’ rights of self-determination, making every reasonable effort to act in accordance with residents’ wishes.
    • Continually safeguard the confidentiality of residents and not divulge any information unless an immediate life-threatening situation overrides this discretion.
    • Participate in efforts to promote a quality long-term care system.
    • Avoid any conflict of interest or appearance of conflict of interest (including gain) in the provision of Ombudsman services within nursing or Assisted Living Homes.

You Can Volunteer!

Here's your chance to give back.

Are you interested in using your time and talents to serve as an advocate for nursing home and adult care facility residents? The Long Term Care Ombudsman Program is looking for volunteers to serve as certified Ombudsmen to improve the quality of care and quality of life to residents living in long term care facilities.

Certified Ombudsman not only visit residents, investigate and resolve complaints, but also use their skills to advocate for the rights of residents in nursing homes and other long term care facilities. The dual focus of quality of care and quality of life enables the volunteers to assure that residents are cared for appropriately.

Volunteers serve as a voice for residents of nursing homes and assisted living centers. Certified Ombudsmen are indispensable in ensuring that all facilities meet mandated, legal standards for every person requiring long term care.

Volunteer helping elderly woman

If you are interested, please contact the Ombudsman in your county. Statewide Ombudsman Locations

Resources

Utah Department of Health (Licensing & Resident Assessment):
http://health.utah.gov/hflcra

Disability Law Center:
www.disabilitylawcenter.org

Medicare Nursing Home Compare:
http://www.medicare.gov/nhcompare/home.asp

Centers for Medicaid/Medicare Services:
http://www.cms.hhs.gov

Health Insurance Information Program:
http://www.daas.utah.gov/hiip_contact_list.htm

Utah Home and Community Based Services (HCBS) Waiver Programs:
http://www.rules.utah.gov/publicat/code/r432/r432-150.htm

Utah Nursing Assistant Registry:
http://www.utahcna.com

Administration on Aging:
http://www.aoa.gov/

National Ombudsman Resource Center (NORC):
http://www.ltcombudsman.org

Assisted Living Consumer Alliance:
http://www.assistedlivingconsumers.org

Utah Department of Human Services:
http://dhs.utah.gov